Calmi Cuori Appassionati

Reisei to Jōnetsu no Aida
Calmi Cuori Appassionati

DVD cover

Directed by
Isamu Nakae

Produced by
Toru Ota

Written by
Kaori Eguni (novel)
Fumie Mizuhashi
Jinsei Tsuji (novel)

Starring
Yutaka Takenouchi
Kelly Chen
Roberto Brunetti

Music by
Enya
Ryo Yoshimata

Cinematography
Toyoshi Tsuda

Edited by
Hiroshi Matsuo

Release date

2001 (2001)

Running time

125 minutes

Country
Japan

Language
Japanese

Box office
¥2.7 billion ($34,846,000)[1]

Calmi Cuori Appassionati (冷静と情熱のあいだ aka Reisei to Jōnetsu no Aida; lit. “Between Calmness and Passion”) is a 2001 Japanese movie directed by Isamu Nakae, starring Yutaka Takenouchi and Kelly Chen. It is a love story about two students who met at an art college in Japan. The film is based on a 1999 novel which was a best seller in Japan.[2] Calmi Cuori Appassionati was a hit, becoming the 8th highest grossing film in Japan of 2001.
The title tune is “Wild Child” from the album A Day Without Rain by Enya. An album of Enya’s songs used in the film was released in 2001 as Themes from Calmi Cuori Appassionati.

Contents

1 Plot
2 Cast
3 Award Nominations
4 Notes
5 External links

Plot[edit]

Living in Florence, Italy, Junsei Agata is studying to be a restoration expert who specializes in fine art. He feels life is empty. He was clinging to the memory of one girl with whom he spent his school days. Her name was Aoi. One day, he learns Aoi is in Milan and finds she lives with a wealthy American businessman. He finds she lives in a different world and runs away to Japan.
Junsei remembers a 10-year promise. When he was a college student in Japan, he made a promise with Aoi to meet on the top of the Duomo in Florence on her 30th birthday. He hangs on to one slight hope that Aoi must have remembered the promise. He decides to return to Florence to prove the love between him and Aoi is true.

Cast[edit]

Yutaka Takenouchi as Agata Junsei
Kelly Chen as Aoi
Roberto Brunetti as Luca
Valeria Cavalli as Giovanna
Luciano Federico as Angelo
Silvia Ferreri as Daniela
Arnoldo Foà as The Restorer
Reona Hirota as Asami
Nana Katase
Hisanori Koshimizu
Tatsuo Matsumura as Seiji Agata
Ryôta Matsushima
Marisa Merlini as Gina
Shinya Owada as Kiyomasa Agata
Kenichi Sano
Yusuke Santamaria as Takashi
Kippei Shiina as Takanashi
Ryoko Shinohara as Memi
Sansei Shiomi as The Lawyer
Michael Wong as Marvin Lai

Award Nominations[edit]
2002 Awards of the Japanese Academy[3]

Nomination – Bes

Fort Discovery

Fort Discovery

Established
April 1997

Dissolved
December 2010

Location
1 Seventh Street
Augusta, Georgia,  United States

Coordinates
33°28′36″N 81°57′44″W / 33.4768°N 81.9622°W / 33.4768; -81.9622

Visitors
200,000 (2007)

Director
Rob Dennis

The National Science Center’s Fort Discovery, generally known as Fort Discovery, was a 128,000-square-foot (11,900 m2), children’s science exhibition center and museum located in downtown Augusta, Georgia, at Riverwalk Augusta. The museum was located in the former Shoppes at Port Royal, which operated from 1991 to 1994.
Fort Discovery featured over 250 hands-on exhibits that demonstrated various scientific concepts. It featured several rides such as a high-wire bicycle, the human gyroscope, and space moon walk, each demonstrating a fundamental concept of physics. The center opened in April 1997. In late 2003, the state cut off funds to the center and Fort Discovery was at danger of closing. In early 2004, the city and community funded Fort Discovery until January 2005, when the state started funding the center once more.
National Science Center relocated to Washington, D.C. after Fort Discovery closed permanently on December 31, 2010.
The property has since been gutted, and the building still stands but remains vacant.
The property is currently being rebuilt. Unisys has one portion of the building as its new center in Augusta

State of Georgia portal

External links[edit]

Fort Discovery closing, National Science Center leaving, WRDW-TV
YouTube video tours of Fort Discovery

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Augusta, Georgia

History

History
Timeline
List of mayors
Cumming v. Richmond County Bd. of Ed.
Notable past/present residents

Arts and culture

Arts and culture in Augusta

Colleges and universities

Augusta Technical College
Augusta University
Paine College

K-12 education

Richmond County School System
Augusta Education

Hospitals

Doctors Hospital
Eisenhower Army Medical Center
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Norwood VA Medical Ctr.
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University Hospital

Sports

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Augusta GreenJackets
Augusta RiverHawks

Venues

Augusta National Golf Club
Lake Olmstead Stadium
James Brown Arena
Christenberry Fieldhouse
Riverwalk Augusta

Media

Media in Augusta, Georgia

See also
Category:Augusta, Georgia

Laverne, California

For the city in Los Angeles County, see La Verne, California.
Laverne is a former settlement in Marin County, California.[1] It was located 1.5 miles (2.4 km) west of Mill Valley.[1]
A post office operated at Laverne from 1909 to 1914.[1]
References[edit]

^ a b c Durham, David L. (1998). California’s Geographic Names: A Gazetteer of Historic and Modern Names of the State. Clovis, Calif.: Word Dancer Press. p. 664. ISBN 1-884995-14-4. 

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Municipalities and communities of Marin County, California, United States

County seat: San Rafael

Cities and towns

Belvedere
Corte Madera
Fairfax
Larkspur
Mill Valley
Novato
Ross
San Anselmo
San Rafael
Sausalito
Tiburon

CDPs

Alto
Black Point-Green Point
Bolinas
Dillon Beach
Inverness
Kentfield
Lagunitas-Forest Knolls
Lucas Valley-Marinwood
Marin City
Muir Beach
Nicasio
Point Reyes Station
San Geronimo
Santa Venetia
Sleepy Hollow
Stinson Beach
Strawberry
Tamalpais-Homestead Valley
Tomales
Woodacre

Unincorporated
communities

Almonte
Bel Marin Keys
Belvedere Island
Bivalve
Black Point
Blakes Landing
Burdell
California Park
Cerro
Chapman
Cypress Grove
Dewitt
Dogtown
El Campo
Fallon
Five Brooks
Forest Knolls
Gallinas
Greenbrae
Hamlet
Harbor Point
Homestead Valley
Ignacio
Inverness Park
Jewell
Kent Woodlands
Lagunitas
Lairds Landing
Las Gallinas
Los Ranchitos
Lucas Valley
Manzanita
Marconi
Marinwood
Marshall
McDonald
McNears Beach
Meadowsweet
Millerton
Murray Park
Nick’s Cove
Ocean Roar
Old Town
Olema
Paradise Cay
Reed
Reynolds
Sacramento Landing
Saint Vincent
San Antonio
San Quentin
Seahaven
Shafter
Strawberry Manor
Tamalpais Valley
Tamalpais Valley Junction
Tocaloma
Vincent Landing
Waldo

Ghost towns

Bothin
Fairford
Forbes
Garcia
Golf
Irving
Laverne
Locust
Machin
Mailliard
Miller
Olumpali
Point Reyes
Taylorville

This Marin County, California-related article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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2014 Nebraska Cornhuskers football team

2014 Nebraska Cornhuskers football

Holiday Bowl vs. USC, L 42–45

Conference
Big Ten Conference

Division
West Division

2014 record
9–4 (5–3 Big Ten)

Head coach
Bo Pelini (Regular Season; 7th Year)
Barney Cotton (Bowl Game)

Offensive coordinator
Tim Beck (4th year)

Offensive scheme
Spread

Defensive coordinator
John Papuchis (3rd year)

Base defense
4–3 defense

Home stadium
Memorial Stadium
(Capacity: 87,091)

Seasons

← 2013
2015 →

2014 Big Ten football standings

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Conf
 
 
Overall

Team
 
W
 
L
 
 
 
 
W
 
L
 

East Division

#1 Ohio State x$#^
 
8

0
 
 
 
 
14

1
 

#5T Michigan State
 
7

1
 
 
 
 
11

2
 

Maryland
 
4

4
 
 
 
 
7

6
 

Rutgers
 
3

5
 
 
 
 
8

5
 

Michigan
 
3

5
 
 
 
 
5

7
 

Penn State
 
2

6
 
 
 
 
7

6
 

Indiana
 
1

7
 
 
 
 
4

8
 

West Division

#13 Wisconsin x
 
7

1
 
 
 
 
11

3
 

Minnesota
 
5

3
 
 
 
 
8

5
 

Nebraska
 
5

3
 
 
 
 
9

4
 

Iowa
 
4

4
 
 
 
 
7

6
 

Illinois
 
3

5
 
 
 
 
6

7
 

Northwestern
 
3

5
 
 
 
 
5

7
 

Purdue
 
1

7
 
 
 
 
3

9
 

Championship: Ohio State 59, Wisconsin 0

# – College Football Playoff champion
^ – College Football Playoff participant
$ – Conference champion
x – Division champion/co-champions

As of January 13, 2015; Rankings from AP Poll

The 2014 Nebraska Cornhuskers football team represented the University of Nebraska in the 2014 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The team was coached by Bo Pelini and played their home games at Memorial Stadium in Lincoln, Nebraska. They were members of the West Division of the Big Ten Conference. They finished the season 9–4, 5–3 in Big Ten play to finish in a tie for second place in the West Division. Following losses to both Wisconsin and Minnesota and a come from behind win in overtime at Iowa, Pelini was relieved of his coaching duties follow

Carolyn Geise

Carolyn Lee Geise (born September 8, 1935) is an American architect.[1]
She was born Carolyn Lee Deuter in Olympia, Washington and grew up there and in Seattle. She earned a BA in clothing and textiles from Whitman College and then a B.Arch. from the University of Washington in 1963. After graduating, she worked for Ralph Anderson and Jane Hastings. She established Geise Architects, her own firm, in 1978. Geise was named an American Institute of Architects (AIA) fellow in 1989; she was the AIA Seattle medallist in 2001. A Life Works Series presentation sponsored by the Seattle chapter of the AIA was presented in Seattle in 2005.[1][2] In 2013, she received the Housing Hero Award from the Low Income Housing Institute for designing low income housing and facilities for the community.[3]
Geise played an important role in the revitalization of Seattle’s Belltown neighbourhood.[4]
She married John Herbert Geise in 1962.[2]
By the age of 27, Geise had climbed Mount Rainier three times. She had also worked with Jim Whittaker as a ski instructor.[2]
Selected work[edit]

Peter and Mell Schoening residence (1965), in partnership with Jane Hastings
Howard and Ruth Pande residence (1974-75)
Seattle’s Children’s Home Activity Center (1984)
Child Study and Treatment Center, Steilacoom (1985)
HomeSight low-income housing project, Seattle (1987-99)
Growing Vine Street community project, Seattle (1994-2007), with others
renovation of Third Church of Christ, Scientist, Seattle (2008-13)[1]

References[edit]

^ a b c Ochsner, Jeffrey Karl (2016). Shaping Seattle Architecture: A Historical Guide to the Architects. p. 43. ISBN 0295806893. 
^ a b c “Carolyn Lee Geise (Architect)”. Pacific Coast Architecture Database. 
^ “LIHI gala & auction a big success”. Northwest Asian Weekly. December 2, 2013. 
^ Klein, Rena M (2010). The Architect’s Guide to Small Firm Management: Making Chaos Work for Your Small Firm. pp. 90–92. ISBN 0470916850. 

This article about a United States architect or architectural firm is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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Hostuviroid

Hostuviroid

Virus classification

Group:
Viroids

Family:
Pospiviroidae

Genus:
Hostuviroid

Species

Hop stunt viroid

Hostuviroid is a genus of viroids that includes the hop stunt viroids, a group of viroids that infects many different types of plants, including the common hop plant.
Some hostuviroids:

Citrus gummy bark viroid
Grapevine viroid

This virus-related article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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John Gore (Royal Navy officer, died 1790)

John Gore by John Webber, 1780

Captain John Gore (died 10 August 1790) was a British American sailor who circumnavigated the globe four times with the Royal Navy in the 18th century and accompanied Captain James Cook in his discoveries in the Pacific Ocean.
History[edit]
Although little is known about John Gore before his service with the Royal Navy, it is believed he was born in the British Colony of Virginia in either 1729 or 1730. He first appears in the record books in 1755, joining HMS Windsor at Portsmouth as a midshipman.
Five years later Gore took his lieutenant’s exam and was appointed master’s mate of HMS Dolphin. Aboard the Dolphin Gore circumnavigated the globe twice—first under John Byron and then Samuel Wallis. His experience in the Pacific Ocean and on extended navy expeditions led to him being called up to join James Cook’s mission to record the Transit of Venus in Tahiti and search for Terra Australis in 1768 aboard HMS Endeavour. On Endeavour, Gore was initially third-in-command (i.e. 3rd Lieutenant) behind Cook (1st Lieutenant) and Zachary Hicks (2nd Lieutenant). After the death of Hicks on the return voyage to England on 26 May 1771, Gore became second-in-command (2nd Lieutenant) [1]
Gore had previously been part of the Royal Navy crew aboard Wallis’s Dolphin that had “discovered” Tahiti and he became valuable to Cook for his knowledge of the island. In 1769 Gore became the first recorded person on the expedition to shoot and kill a person of Māori descent, following an altercation over a piece of cloth as the Endeavour charted the coast of New Zealand. Later, on 14 July 1770 Gore became famous for being the first person to shoot and kill a kangaroo (for scientific research) as the expedition made its way up the eastern seaboard of Australia.
Returning to England, in 1772 Gore joined the botanist Joseph Banks (who had also been on Cook’s first Pacific voyage) in a private scientific expedition to Iceland and the Hebrides. Gore and Banks may have become friends as evidence shows that Banks was the executor of Gore’s will. The trip did not return until after Cook had sailed on his second Pacific voyage.
However, in 1776 Gore answered the call from Cook and the admiralty once again and joined HMS Resolution as First Lieutenant for Cook’s third voyage. As the Resolution explored the Pacific in search of the famed Northwest Passage, Gore would sight the American continent of his birth from the west coast. Later, following Cook’s dea

Knobeloch-Seibert Farm

Knobeloch-Seibert Farm

U.S. National Register of Historic Places

Overview from north

Location
Belleville, St. Clair County, Illinois

Coordinates
38°31′18″N 89°59′43″W / 38.52167°N 89.99528°W / 38.52167; -89.99528Coordinates: 38°31′18″N 89°59′43″W / 38.52167°N 89.99528°W / 38.52167; -89.99528

Area
8 acres (3.2 ha)

Built
c. 1832

NRHP Reference #
83004186[1]

Added to NRHP
May 9, 1983

The Knobeloch-Seibert Farm is a historic farm located on the east side of Schneider Road east of Belleville, Illinois. The farm was established circa 1832 by John W. Knobeloch and his family; after passing through several generations of the Knobeloch family, it was inherited by Henry Seibert. Both the Knobeloch and Seibert families immigrated to the area from Germany as part of a wave of German immigration to Illinois’ American Bottom region in the early 1800s. The first building on the farm was a farmhouse built in 1832, which no longer stands; the oldest surviving building on the farm is the 1844 barn. The second farmhouse, constructed in 1861, features a segmented arched brick cellar, a characteristic feature of German vernacular architecture.[2]
The farm was added to the National Register of Historic Places on May 9, 1983.[1]
References[edit]

^ a b National Park Service (2010-07-09). “National Register Information System”. National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 
^ Sculle, Keith A., and Michael Ward. National Register of Historic Places Inventory/Nomination: Knobeloch-Seibert Farm. National Park Service.

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U.S. National Register of Historic Places

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Martin Štěpánek

Martin Štěpánek may refer to:

Martin Štěpánek (actor) (1947–2010), Czech actor and politician
Martin Štěpánek (free-diver) (born 1977), Czech free-diver
Martin Štěpánek (tennis), Czech tennis player and coach
Martin Štěpánek (ice hockey), Czech ice hockey player, see 2000 IIHF World Championship rosters

This disambiguation page lists articles about people with the same name. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the intended article.

Finland at the 2011 World Aquatics Championships

Finland at the
2011 World Aquatics Championships

Flag of Finland

FINA code
FIN

NF
Suomen Uimaliitto

Website
www.uimaliitto.fi

in Shanghai, China

Medals

Gold
Silver
Bronze
Total

0
0
0
0

World Aquatics Championships appearances

1973
1975
1978
1982
1986
1991
1994
1998
2001
2003
2005
2007
2009
2011
2013
2015

Finland competed at the 2011 World Aquatics Championships in Shanghai, China between July 16 and 31, 2011.
Diving[edit]
Main article: Diving at the 2011 World Aquatics Championships
Finland qualified 1 athlete in diving.[1]

Men

Athlete
Event
Preliminary
Semifinals
Final

Points
Rank
Points
Rank
Points
Rank

Ville Vahtola
Men’s 1m Springboard
321.95
24

Did not advance

Men’s 3m Springboard
364.80
33
Did not advance

Swimming[edit]
Main article: Swimming at the 2011 World Aquatics Championships
Finland qualified 6 swimmers.[2]

Men

Athlete
Event
Heats
Semifinals
Final

Time
Rank
Time
Rank
Time
Rank

Ari-Pekka Liukkonen
Men’s 50m Freestyle
22.67
27
Did not advance

Iisakki Ratilainen
Men’s 50m Breaststroke
28.58
32
Did not advance

Women

Athlete
Event
Heats
Semifinals
Final

Time
Rank
Time
Rank
Time
Rank

Hanna-Maria Seppala
Women’s 50m Freestyle
25.79
23
Did not advance

Women’s 100m Freestyle
55.06
20
Did not advance

Women’s 100m Backstroke
1:03.18
35
Did not advance

Anni Alitalo
Women’s 50m Backstroke
29.39
31
Did not advance

Jenna Laukkanen
Women’s 100m Breaststroke
1:09.39
22
Did not advance

Women’s 200m Breaststroke
2:30.51
24
Did not advance

Emilia Pikkarainen
Women’s 200m Butterfly
2:12.44
26
Did not advance

Women’s 200m IM
2:19.94
29
Did not advance

Anni Alitalo
Jenna Laukkanen
Emilia Pikkarainen
Hanna-Maria Seppala
Women’s 4 x 100m Medley Relay
4:08.47
16

Did not advance

References[edit]

^ Diving Entry List by Nation[permanent dead link]
^ Swimming Archive

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Nations at the 2011 FINA World Championships in Shanghai, China

Africa

Algeria
Angola
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Burkina Faso
Burundi
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Central African Republic
Comoros
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Americas

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Canada
Cayman Islands
Chile
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Domi